Thursday, April 20, 2017

Read. Read. Read. Then Read Some More.

One of my kids doesn't like to read.

He only confessed to me recently, though I've had my suspicions for years. Even though he was a good reader, he rarely chose reading during free time. He was far more likely to be drawing in a notebook than reading before bed, especially if he'd already completed his required 20 minutes of homework mandated reading. He's so loyal to the few authors he likes that he would rather read a Big Nate  book for the 110th time than try anything new. And he's never told me about a book he's reading spontaneously.

I mention his dislike only to show that:
  1. This happens even in families where everyone else is obsessed with reading,
  2. Clearly nature plays a role here,
  3. It's possible to make your kid read over the summer anyway. 


Even though my darling middle child doesn't like reading, he does it every day - even in the summer. Part of it is because he's not allowed to play video games until he has, but it's also because I've showered him with reasons why he should.

I stole ideas from:

Sure, he's only slightly more enthusiastic about reading (even when it's rereading his favorite graphic novels) than he is about brushing his teeth, but he's still getting the benefits. 

That's why my number one suggestion for summer learning is reading. Make it a goal for your kids to read every day. (They won't. Mine don't. But with a goal of "every day", we manage to read most days. It seems to work.

If your kid struggles with reading, it's even more important for him/her to read as much as possible every summer. But that doesn't mean you have to struggle too. 

You could pin this, you know. 









Read. Read. Read. Then Read Some More.

One of my kids doesn't like to read. He only confessed to me recently, though I've had my suspicions for years. Even though he was...